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Creating a new mutation policy

Mutating policies are similar to validating ones, but also have the ability to mutate an incoming object.

They can:

  • Reject a request
  • Accept a request without changing the incoming object
  • Mutate the incoming object as they need to and accept the request

Writing a Kubewarden mutation policy is uncomplicated. You'll use the validating policy created in the previous sections, and with a few changes, turn it into a mutating one.

Your policy uses the same validation logic defined before, but it also adds an annotation to all the Pods that have a valid name.

Attempting to create a Pod like this:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata:
name: nginx
spec:
containers:
- name: nginx
image: nginx:latest

Leads to the creation of this Pod:

apiVersion: v1
kind: Pod
metadata:
name: nginx
annotations:
kubewarden.policy.demo/inspected: true
spec:
containers:
- name: nginx
image: nginx:latest

Write the mutation code

The mutation code is in the validate function. You should change this function to approve the request using mutate_request instead of accept_request.

This is how the validate function in lib.rs should look:

fn validate(payload: &[u8]) -> CallResult {
let validation_request: ValidationRequest<Settings> = ValidationRequest::new(payload)?;

info!(LOG_DRAIN, "starting validation");
if validation_request.request.kind.kind != apicore::Pod::KIND {
warn!(LOG_DRAIN, "Policy validates Pods only. Accepting resource"; "kind" => &validation_request.request.kind.kind);
return kubewarden::accept_request();
}

match serde_json::from_value::<apicore::Pod>(validation_request.request.object) {
// NOTE 1
Ok(mut pod) => {
let pod_name = pod.metadata.name.clone().unwrap_or_default();
if validation_request
.settings
.invalid_names
.contains(&pod_name)
{
kubewarden::reject_request(
Some(format!("pod name {:?} is not accepted", pod_name)),
None,
None,
None,
)
} else {
// NOTE 2
let mut new_annotations = pod.metadata.annotations.clone().unwrap_or_default();
new_annotations.insert(
String::from("kubewarden.policy.demo/inspected"),
String::from("true"),
);
pod.metadata.annotations = Some(new_annotations);

// NOTE 3
let mutated_object = serde_json::to_value(pod)?;
kubewarden::mutate_request(mutated_object)
}
}
Err(_) => {
// We were forwarded a request we cannot unmarshal or
// understand, just accept it
kubewarden::accept_request()
}
}
}

Compared to the previous code, you have made three changes:

  1. We defined the pod object as mutable, see the mut keyword. This is needed because we will extend its metadata.annotations attribute.
  2. This is the code that takes the existing annotations, adds the new one, and finally puts the updated annotations object back into the original pod instance.
  3. Serialize the pod object into a generic serde_json::Value and then return a mutation response.

Having done these changes, it's time to run unit tests again:

$ cargo test
Compiling demo-a v0.1.0 (/home/jhk/projects/suse/tmp/demo)
Finished test [unoptimized + debuginfo] target(s) in 0.95s
Running unittests src/lib.rs (target/debug/deps/demo_a-634b88b0dcb6e707)

running 5 tests
test settings::tests::reject_settings_without_a_list_of_invalid_names ... ok
test settings::tests::accept_settings_with_a_list_of_invalid_names ... ok
test tests::accept_request_with_non_pod_resource ... ok
test tests::reject_pod_with_invalid_name ... ok
test tests::accept_pod_with_valid_name ... FAILED

failures:

---- tests::accept_pod_with_valid_name stdout ----
{"column":5,"file":"src/lib.rs","level":"info","line":34,"message":"starting validation","policy":"sample-policy"}
thread 'tests::accept_pod_with_valid_name' panicked at src/lib.rs:98:9:
Something mutated with test case: Pod creation with valid name
note: run with `RUST_BACKTRACE=1` environment variable to display a backtrace


failures:
tests::accept_pod_with_valid_name

test result: FAILED. 4 passed; 1 failed; 0 ignored; 0 measured; 0 filtered out; finished in 0.00s

As you can see, the accept_pod_with_valid_name fails because the response contains a mutated object. It looks like our code is working.

Update the unit tests

You can update the accept_pod_with_valid_name in lib.rs to look like this:

#[test]
fn accept_pod_with_valid_name() -> Result<(), ()> {
let mut invalid_names = HashSet::new();
invalid_names.insert(String::from("bad_name1"));
let settings = Settings { invalid_names };

let request_file = "test_data/pod_creation.json";
let tc = Testcase {
name: String::from("Pod creation with valid name"),
fixture_file: String::from(request_file),
expected_validation_result: true,
settings,
};

let res = tc.eval(validate).unwrap();
// NOTE 1
assert!(
res.mutated_object.is_some(),
"Expected accepted object to be mutated",
);

// NOTE 2
let final_pod =
serde_json::from_value::<apicore::Pod>(res.mutated_object.unwrap()).unwrap();
let final_annotations = final_pod.metadata.annotations.unwrap();
assert_eq!(
final_annotations.get_key_value("kubewarden.policy.demo/inspected"),
Some((
&String::from("kubewarden.policy.demo/inspected"),
&String::from("true")
)),
);

Ok(())
}

Compared to the first test, there are two changes:

  1. Change the assert! statement so that the request is still accepted, but it also includes a mutated object
  2. Created a Pod instance starting from the mutated object that's part of the response. Assert the mutated Pod object has the right metadata.annotations.

Run the tests again, this time all shall pass:

$ cargo test
Compiling demo-a v0.1.0 (/home/jhk/projects/suse/tmp/demo)
Finished test [unoptimized + debuginfo] target(s) in 1.25s
Running unittests src/lib.rs (target/debug/deps/demo_a-634b88b0dcb6e707)

running 5 tests
test settings::tests::accept_settings_with_a_list_of_invalid_names ... ok
test settings::tests::reject_settings_without_a_list_of_invalid_names ... ok
test tests::accept_request_with_non_pod_resource ... ok
test tests::reject_pod_with_invalid_name ... ok
test tests::accept_pod_with_valid_name ... ok

test result: ok. 5 passed; 0 failed; 0 ignored; 0 measured; 0 filtered out; finished in 0.00s

As you can see, the creation of a mutation policy is straightforward.